Water and Ice

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*Ten percent of profits from sale of prints or licenses in this gallery will be donated to the Sierra Club Foundation.

Rocks on the surface of College Glacier.
Rocks on the surface of College Glacier in the Hoodoo Mountains | Purchase Prints

Color and texture are my favorite elements in a photograph. Water and ice seem to possess a never-ending range of those elements. They are such simple things that we experience every day. I certainly don’t dwell on thoughts of either most of the time. Yet, I’m still fascinated by them. Two phases of the same molecule, necessary for life and under the right conditions can also take life away.

On large scales, both are incredibly powerful, eroding mountain ranges and coastlines. Water and ice are artforms. Each one creates an infinite variety of patterns. Up close, there is a stunning structure and complexity in ice crystals or the flow of water.

Black and white ice crystals in a small stream near the Sanctuary River in Denali National Park
Great detail in ice near the Sanctuary River in Denali National Park & Preserve | Purchase Prints
Bubbles in ice on Smith Lake in Fairbanks, Alaska
Methane bubbles in Ice – Smith Lake in Fairbanks, Alaska | Purchase Prints

On human timescales, ice seems static, unchanging. But it is often subject to incredible forces of gravity, internal and external stress, as well as wind and ocean currents. Not to mention that with the temperatures on the surface of Earth, there is frequent melt, freeze or refreeze, and sublimation. Deposition, crystal growth, and the transition of snow into firn and then ice through grain growth is a remarkable process. These forces often drive changes in the ice through deformation. Ice presents itself as enormous and powerful forms of glaciers that carve through rock and can simultaneously contain the most delicate feathers of hoarfrost within.

Water in art often invokes thoughts of calm reflections on a lake in summer or seaside vistas. But water displays its most intricate detail in turbulence. Its deepest color shows by contrast with its surroundings.

Spray from Bridal Veil Falls in Keystone Canyon near Valdez, Alaska
Spray from Bridal Veil Falls in Keystone Canyon near Valdez, Alaska | Purchase Prints
Melting snow becoming a stream on the Black Rapids Glacier in the Alaska Range
Melting snow becoming a stream on the Black Rapids Glacier in the Alaska Range | Purchase Prints
Water fans out on a rock in a supraglacial stream in the Alaska Range
Water fans out on a rock in a supraglacial stream in the Alaska Range | Purchase Prints
A small waterfall near the northern arm of the Worthington Glacier
A small waterfall near the northern arm of the Worthington Glacier in the Chugach Mountains

Water and Ice – Photo Project and Collection

My current project involves capturing images of the detail, complexity, and range of color of water and ice. Photographs are both on macro and micro scales. I intend for this to be a life-long endeavor, as I frequently find myself in natural areas with an abundance of this element. I have no guiding vision for this collection, and that’s the way I like it.

This hobby developed organically while out hiking or skiing and taking photos. I’d often get distracted by the surface ice on a stream by the side of the road or go off-track on a glacier trek to follow a supraglacial stream to a moulin. I loved the feeling the images invoked, how I could hear the rushing water, the echo of the ice cave walls, or the trickling water down a small moulin. Sometimes it is just the absolute silence near a growth of ice feathers where there no wind and seemingly no environmental interactions.

You can check out the full Water and Ice Gallery below. A portion of the profit from print or license sales in this gallery will be donated to the Sierra Club Foundation.

an iceberg floating in the waters of Prince William Sound with seagulls on top
Gulls on an iceberg in Prince William Sound | Purchase Prints
Water spirals down a moulin, a hole in glacier ice leading to the bottom of the glacier
Water spirals down a large moulin in the Alaska Range | Purchase Prints

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