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Rating: 5 out of 5.

Gear Review | My Gear | Photo Gear

Image of Sigma 17-50mm f/2.8 lens
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For Sensor TypeAPS-C
List Price$669, but typically available for under $300
Angle of View72.4° – 27.9°
Aperture Rangef/2.8-f/22
Filter Size77mm
Weight565g/19.9oz

Intro – Sigma 17-50mm f/2.8

I originally purchased the Sigma 17-50mm f/2.8 because I wanted an inexpensive, better than a “kit” lens that would serve as a good walk-around lens, primarily for hiking. I was instantly impressed with the quality of the images, and it has become one of my favorites. It’s even been an impressive northern lights and night photography lens. The color and detail always seem vibrant and sharp.

I’m constantly hiking in rough terrain and I can say this lens can take a decent beating. Once I did manage to crack the glass while bushwacking through alders in the interior of Alaska, but I wasn’t surprised with the hits it was taking. At less than $300, I didn’t quite have to break the bank to replace it, and I was quick to buy the same lens. The weather-sealing on the lens is also pretty good, definitely not waterproof, but mine has spent some time in the rain with no issues, and I’ve shot in -40°F/C temperatures also without problems.

The Good and Bad

It has a zoom lock that is really useful for night photography and wonderful for hiking since it often sits on my Peak Design Capture Camera Clip. The Hyper-Sonic Motor is quick, moderately quiet, and I never seem to have a problem with auto-focus. The zoom ring feels a bit stiff, but this works for me as I’m often shooting on a tripod and don’t want to accidentally bump it out of place.

At the minimum focal length (right at 17mm) there’s a bit of distortion and vignetting, especially at the corners, but most processing software can help minimize this. It hasn’t been damaging enough to keep me from shooting at 17mm. Overall this lens has become a stable for my crop sensor Nikon cameras!

Sample Photos (Edited)

You can read more and find tech specs on the sigma website here: https://www.sigmaphoto.com/17-50mm-f28-ex-dc-os-hsm

Be sure to check out my Aurora Photography Tutorials and Alaska Guide!

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